500 Years Strong

FAKE CHURCH = FAKE NEWS

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Martinizing the King

martin-king

Martin Luther, righteous King,
made the Reformation sing.
Popes and peasants, out of key
turned it into misery.
German beer and Roman crimes
made for most uncivil times
much like our own. We must confess
rights and wrongs we yet possess…

Half a millennium later on
a Baptist pastor and his son
took this noble Saxon name
and furthered the Reformer’s fame.
Some revisionists deny
St. Martin Luther’s role, and try
to minimize theology
in civil rights chronology.
The second Luther of my song
inspired—but did not last as long.
Social Justice notwithstanding,
King’s successors need re-branding.
Politicians steal his mantle,
cloak their lies in his example;
agitators claim his glory
editing God out of the story;
educators sing his praises
but some people’s conduct raises
doubts about that dream of King—
and hope… and change…  and everything.

martinized

 

St. Martin Luther Nails It (rap rap)

reformation-day-party

 (…) the defeat of evil and of demonic powers is associated with Halloween. For this reason, Martin Luther posted his 95 challenges to the wicked practices of the Church to the bulletin board on the door of the Wittenberg chapel on Halloween. He picked his day with care, and ever since Halloween has also been Reformation Day.

from: The American Vision

At the time, few would have suspected that the sound of a hammer striking the castle church door in Wittenberg, Germany, would soon be heard around the world and lead ultimately to the greatest transformation of Western society since the apostles first preached the Gospel throughout the Roman empire. Martin Luther’s nailing of his ninety-five theses to the church door on October 31, 1517, provoked a debate that culminated finally in what we now call the Protestant Reformation.

from: LIGONIER Ministries

 

 

Luther Nails It Again (rap rap rap)

On Friday, much of the culture will be focused on candy and things that go bump in the night. Protestants, however, have something far more significant to celebrate on October 31. Friday is Reformation Day, which commemorates what was perhaps the greatest move of God’s Spirit since the days of the Apostles. But what is the significance of Reformation Day, and how should we consider the events it commemorates?

At the time, few would have suspected that the sound of a hammer striking the castle church door in Wittenberg, Germany, would soon be heard around the world and lead ultimately to the greatest transformation of Western society since the apostles first preached the Gospel throughout the Roman empire. Martin Luther’s nailing of his ninety-five theses to the church door on October 31, 1517, provoked a debate that culminated finally in what we now call the Protestant Reformation.

from: LIGONIER Ministries